MAPT

Massachusetts Adult Proficiency Tests (MAPT) – ABE Reading & Mathematics

Key resources for teachers and directors:

The Massachusetts Adult Proficiency Tests (MAPT) comprise ABE reading and math tests at several levels. The knowledge and skills measured by the MAPT come directly from the Massachusetts ABE Curriculum Frameworks. You can view and/or download the ACLS policy manual.

The tests are web-based, with test takers working at laptops or desktops with an Internet connection. The tests are adaptive in that the software tailors each sequence of items to specific learners by tracking their performance as they test. No separate forms of the test (e.g., TABE) are needed because test-takers are given different items each time they test.

Trained teachers are given a login to use the MAPT system, but they cannot view the actual tests. After intake at their programs, learners with a SMARTT ID can login and access the complete MAPT system: Sample Questions, Practice Tests for both reading and mathematics, and the operational tests for reading and mathematics.

The Sample Questions include four questions in each subject area that walk the students through some basic tools and terms needed to take the assessment. Twenty-item Practice Tests are available at every learning level for each subject area. These are designed to help learners and teachers see sample content at each level, as well as to double-check whether they are starting at an appropriate test level. They also provide a way for teachers to ensure that the technology in their classroom or computer lab is ready to go for MAPT.

The reading and mathematics tests each and take about 60 minutes to complete. There are currently four levels of math tests (from Beginning ABE through GED/College Transition) and three levels of reading tests (from Emerging through Advancing) Literacy level tests are not yet available for either area as yet.

When a learner completes a MAPT, a score report is displayed on the screen that includes their scale score, the MAPT subject, and their frameworks level. Scores are automatically uploaded to the SMARTT system so they no longer need to be manually entered and sent.

MAPT Tests and Their Correlations to CFs and GLE and NRS levels

The table below indicates how the math and reading test levels correlate with the Massachusetts ABE Mathematics/Numeracy & the Reading Strand of the English Language Arts Curriculum Frameworks. The table also indicates how MAPT test scores correlate with GLE and NRS levels.

MAPT for Math Test Name
Math CF Level
MAPT Scale Score
GLE Range
NRS Level
N/A (use TABE Level L)
Beginning Adult Numeracy
N/A
0 – 1.9
Beginning Literacy
Math 2 (Beginning ABE)
Beginning ABE
200 – 299
2 – 3.9
Beginning Basic
Math 3 (Intermediate ABE)
Intermediate ABE
300 – 399
4 – 5.9
Low Intermediate
Math 4 (Pre-GED)
Pre-GED
400 – 499
6 – 8.9
High Intermediate
Math 5 (GED/College Trans)
GED
500 – 599
9 – 10.9
Low ASE
Bridge to College
600 – 700*
11 – 12.9
High ASE

Note: Learners who enter a program in the High ASE level by scoring 600 and above on their MAPT pre-test are considered to have completed their federal level if they got their GED. They are excluded from the pre/post test performance standard. Programs may choose to post-test these learners if they wish, but are not required to. If they do, then they are included in the Learning Gains Performance Standard.

MAPT for Reading Test
ELA Reading CF Strand
MAPT Scale Score
GLE Range
NRS Level
N/A (use TABE Level L)
Initial
Use TABE L Scores
0 – 1.9
Beginning Literacy
Reading 2 (Emerging)
Emerging
200 – 299
2 – 3.9
Beginning Basic
Reading 3 (Transitional)
Transitional
300 – 399
4 – 5.9
Low Intermediate
Reading 4 (Advancing) Advancing
400 – 499
6 – 8.9
High Intermediate
N/A*
Adept
500 – 599
9 – 10.9
Low ASE
600 – 700
11 – 12.9
High ASE

* There is no MAPT test name here because there are only three starting points for learners taking the Reading test. Their final scores, however, could place them in the “Adept” level (e.g., a learner who enters the test at “Advancing” starting point and does well enough to be classified as “Adept.”

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Required Staff Training

Only staff who have attended an ACLS/UMass or SABES training may administer the MAPT. At least two staff per program must be ACLS/SABES trained to administer the tests. Trained MAPT administrators may train other staff at their programs, but the training must be thorough to avoid real-time testing problems and unreliable score data. Programs must maintain two staff trained by ACLS/SABES at all times.

Administering the MAPT

Follow these steps at your program to ensure effective testing and reliable results:

  1. Align your intake/placement instruments with MAPT test levels. This is best accomplished by asking staff involved with placement and learning gains assessment to review the twenty-item Practice Tests for each level of the reading and mathematics tests. In this way, they are more likely to assign learners to the correct test level.
  2. Do not start your test taker at an artificially low test level. This practice will lead to scoring swings that will undermine data reliability.
  3. Make certain that the test taker has a student ID generated via a complete SMARTT intake. Watch for duplicate IDs or other problems that will lead to report errors. Learners should have only one SMARTT ID.
  4. Before any learner first takes a reading or math MAPT, she or he must go through the Sample Questions. Note that the questions are different for reading and math and prepare them in different ways.
  5. While the Practice Tests are optional, they help both learner and administrator make sure that the learner is testing at the correct level.
  6. Make sure the computers you will use for testing can handle practice questions flawlessly. This step will avoid problems during actual test administration.
  7. The MAPT must be proctored. Provide a quiet area for testing with enough time for completion, 90-120 minutes. While MAPT can handle starts and stops, avoiding them will lessen the likelihood of scoring problems.
  8. After a learner begins a test, he or she will have two weeks to complete a given test (math or reading). If more time is needed, use the “Send Message” screen to ask for additional time.
  9. To ensure the quickest response time, use the “Send Message” screen for any questions you have during a learner’s test or to resolve any difficulties you encounter.

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Testing Accommodations

Accommodations may be given to learners who have a documented formal diagnosis of a learning disability carried out by a licensed professional: a medical doctor, psychologist or psychiatrist or, in some cases, specialists for whom they have signed off. Overlays to increase display contrast and paste-on magnifiers have been known to help. In the case of math tests, teachers may read questions aloud for reading-impaired learners. If you have any questions about possible accommodations, please contact Jane Schwerdtfeger at: janes@doe.mass.edu

Entering Test Data

Programs need to pre- and post-test enrolled students each fiscal year in their primary assessment area in order to capture student educational gain. The general recommendation is to post-test after an interval of four months or 65 hours of instruction, whichever comes first. Because the intensity of classes varies among programs, some adult learners in intensive classes might attend 65 hours of instruction before two months have elapsed. “Meaningful educational gain” is 21 or more scale score points for either reading or math.

Programs that offer intensive classes may pre- and post-test students who have enrolled after April 1st if they attend 65 hours of instruction before June 30th. Any type of attended hours qualify, including rate-based class hours, non rate-based hours, match hours, and distance learning hours.

SMARTT Partial Intakes

Programs running summer classes will need to test learners before their sites have rolled over into the next Fiscal Year (after June 30th). During this time, a “partial intake” may be done to generate a SMARTT ID for new students entering the program as a stopgap until a site is rolled over. Programs must convert all partial intakes into full intakes immediately after their site rolls over. To convert partial intakes into full intakes, select “Partial Intakes” from the SMARTT Student Search page and select the partial intake to be converted, and then click on “Complete Intake.”

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